Can school integration efforts in Hartford, CT inform action in Baltimore, MD?

Susan Eaton explores this question in “Years After a Landmark Court Decision, Connecticut’s Solution to School Segregation Shows Promise: Can it Inform Action in Baltimore,” published by The Abell Report.

We Are From Hazleton: A Baseball Celebrity Helps Bring His Divided Pennsylvania Hometown Together

Hazleton, PA gained notoriety in 2006 when it became the first municipality to pass its own anti-immigration ordinance. These days, it’s getting attention for an ambitious effort to bring together the Latino immigrant and white communities. Tampa Bay Rays manager Joe Maddon, who grew up in Hazleton, helped jump start the burgeoning Hazleton Integration Project. You’ll find this Story From the Field here.

METCO Honors Susan Eaton

One Nation Indivisible’s co-director Susan Eaton will receive an “Educational Pioneer” award at METCO’s fourth annual Evening of Champions Recognition Dinner on Friday, May 10, 2013. Click here for more information.

Lessons From the Former Great White North: Living, Loving and Immigrating in the New Toronto

In matters of immigration and growing diversity, what might the United States learn from its neighbor to the north, Toronto, Canada? In our new Story from the Field, writer Lygia Navarro explores this question in her adopted city.

Public Hearing on Proposed Dual Language and Biliteracy Bills

On Tuesday, April 9, the Massachusetts Legislature’s Joint Committee on Education will hold a public hearing on several bills affecting education, including one that would promote, expand and provide more support to dual language schools, where children learn in English and another language. The bill would also establish a Seal of Biliteracy, which confers recognition to public high school graduates who are fluent in a language other than English.

H.533 would establish an office of “dual language education” within the Department of Elementary and Secondary Education to promote existing schools, study expansion and document “best practices” within dual language schools in the nation. (Download a PDF version of H.533 here.)

Currently, there are several two way immersion schools (also known as two-way bilingual schools) in Massachusetts. These are a type of dual immersion school in which roughly equal shares of native English speakers and fluent speakers of another language, usually Spanish, learn in both languages. Such schools have grown in popularity in recent years throughout the nation.

In Massachusetts, these schools are located in Boston, Cambridge, Chelsea and Framingham. To learn more about them, read One Nation Indivisible’s story, “Have We Learned Our Language Lesson?

The Seal of Biliteracy would be affixed to students’ high school diplomas or reflected on their transcripts. Bill sponsors in the Massachusetts House and Senate say that the goal of the seal is to encourage students to learn foreign languages, to provide employers a way to identify biliterate people, to “prepare people with 21st century skills” and to “strengthen intergroup relationships, affirm the value of diversity and honor the multiple languages of a community.” Similar measures have passed in state legislatures in New York and California.

The public hearing will be held at 10 am in Room A-1 at the Statehouse, 24 Beacon Street, Boston, MA. Advocacy materials are available through the Massachusetts Association for Bilingual Education.

Why It Makes Sense: African Americans and Latinos in Pro-Immigrant Baltimore

One Nation Indivisible’s new audio slideshow by documentary photographer Mario Quiroz-Servellón brings us images and voices from Baltimore, a city that has witnessed enormous demographic change in recent decades. You’ll find it here.

Can Nebraska Show a Separate, Unequal Nation a Better Way?

This month we visit classrooms, hallways and neighborhoods in and around Omaha, where a unique regional education model enables students to leave their homogeneous school districts and experience diversity in an otherwise segregated region. You’ll find this Story From the Field here.

Philadelphia’s Bet on Attracting and Retaining Immigrants Pays Off

Writer Helen Ubiñas takes us along Philadelphia’s vibrant commercial strips, inside immigrant-led businesses, to civics classes and into City Hall to talk with people who’ve helped enliven neighborhoods and reverse a decades-long population decline. You’ll find this Story From the Field here.

“Life in 98118 – One of America’s Most Diverse Zip Codes”

November’s Story from the Field is a personal essay from writer Wendy Call who lives in Seattle’s Rainier Valley. “In another half century,” she writes, “the faces of today’s 98118 will strongly resemble the faces of our entire nation.” You’ll find this Story From the Field here.

Health Care Providers Respond to Demographic Transformation

Our newest story profiles promotora health workers in Dalton, GA who play a vital role in the community by providing security and care for immigrants pushed to the margins by harsh immigration policies and tough economic times. You’ll find September’s Story From the Field here.

Can school integration efforts in Hartford, CT inform action in Baltimore, MD?

Jul 11, 2013

We Are From Hazleton: A Baseball Celebrity Helps Bring His Divided Pennsylvania Hometown Together

Jun 4, 2013

Hazleton, PA gained notoriety in 2006 when it became the first municipality to pass its own anti-immigration ordinance. These days, it’s getting attention for an ambitious effort to bring together the Latino immigrant and white communities. Tampa Bay Rays manager Joe Maddon, who grew up in Hazleton, helped jump start the burgeoning Hazleton Integration Project. You’ll find this Story From the Field here.

METCO Honors Susan Eaton

May 10, 2013

One Nation Indivisible’s co-director Susan Eaton will receive an “Educational Pioneer” award at METCO’s fourth annual Evening of Champions Recognition Dinner on Friday, May 10, 2013. Click here for more information.

Lessons From the Former Great White North: Living, Loving and Immigrating in the New Toronto

Apr 15, 2013

In matters of immigration and growing diversity, what might the United States learn from its neighbor to the north, Toronto, Canada? In our new Story from the Field, writer Lygia Navarro explores this question in her adopted city.

Public Hearing on Proposed Dual Language and Biliteracy Bills

Apr 2, 2013

On Tuesday, April 9, the Massachusetts Legislature’s Joint Committee on Education will hold a public hearing on several bills affecting education, including one that would promote, expand and provide more support to dual language schools, where children learn in English and another language. The bill would also establish a Seal of Biliteracy, which confers recognition to public high school graduates who are fluent in a language other than English.

H.533 would establish an office of “dual language education” within the Department of Elementary and Secondary Education to promote existing schools, study expansion and document “best practices” within dual language schools in the nation. (Download a PDF version of H.533 here.)

Currently, there are several two way immersion schools (also known as two-way bilingual schools) in Massachusetts. These are a type of dual immersion school in which roughly equal shares of native English speakers and fluent speakers of another language, usually Spanish, learn in both languages. Such schools have grown in popularity in recent years throughout the nation.

In Massachusetts, these schools are located in Boston, Cambridge, Chelsea and Framingham. To learn more about them, read One Nation Indivisible’s story, “Have We Learned Our Language Lesson?

The Seal of Biliteracy would be affixed to students’ high school diplomas or reflected on their transcripts. Bill sponsors in the Massachusetts House and Senate say that the goal of the seal is to encourage students to learn foreign languages, to provide employers a way to identify biliterate people, to “prepare people with 21st century skills” and to “strengthen intergroup relationships, affirm the value of diversity and honor the multiple languages of a community.” Similar measures have passed in state legislatures in New York and California.

The public hearing will be held at 10 am in Room A-1 at the Statehouse, 24 Beacon Street, Boston, MA. Advocacy materials are available through the Massachusetts Association for Bilingual Education.

Why It Makes Sense: African Americans and Latinos in Pro-Immigrant Baltimore

Feb 23, 2013

One Nation Indivisible’s new audio slideshow by documentary photographer Mario Quiroz-Servellón brings us images and voices from Baltimore, a city that has witnessed enormous demographic change in recent decades. You’ll find it here.

Can Nebraska Show a Separate, Unequal Nation a Better Way?

Jan 22, 2013

This month we visit classrooms, hallways and neighborhoods in and around Omaha, where a unique regional education model enables students to leave their homogeneous school districts and experience diversity in an otherwise segregated region. You’ll find this Story From the Field here.

Philadelphia’s Bet on Attracting and Retaining Immigrants Pays Off

Jan 3, 2013

Writer Helen Ubiñas takes us along Philadelphia’s vibrant commercial strips, inside immigrant-led businesses, to civics classes and into City Hall to talk with people who’ve helped enliven neighborhoods and reverse a decades-long population decline. You’ll find this Story From the Field here.

“Life in 98118 – One of America’s Most Diverse Zip Codes”

Nov 30, 2012

November’s Story from the Field is a personal essay from writer Wendy Call who lives in Seattle’s Rainier Valley. “In another half century,” she writes, “the faces of today’s 98118 will strongly resemble the faces of our entire nation.” You’ll find this Story From the Field here.

Health Care Providers Respond to Demographic Transformation

Sep 30, 2012

Our newest story profiles promotora health workers in Dalton, GA who play a vital role in the community by providing security and care for immigrants pushed to the margins by harsh immigration policies and tough economic times. You’ll find September’s Story From the Field here.